Research Highlights

    "Tackling the climate and biodiversity crises with transformative farming and technological innovations"
    Measuring MOORCO expt trees

    “…Woodland creation and integration with livestock systems, soil conservation, ecology, hydrology and water management, peatland restoration, natural capital / carbon accounting, renewable energy and associated innovations, land management, land use planning, farmer behaviours, rural development…”. 

     

    Agroforestry is a land management system which combines livestock grazing and forestry - the experimental system at Glensaugh has been in place since 1988.
    Check out our Climate-Positive Farming Reviews where expert scientists synthesise the latest science in key topic areas.
    A dedicated data portal for Glensaugh was created by the James Hutton Institute as part of the Scottish-Government-funded Natural Asset Register.
    Bringing in some of the available spatial data for the farm (and associated catchment where available), this interactive resource allows user-driven display and overlays.
    This exciting new analysis evaluates the impacts and dependencies of past, current and future farm management strategies through a natural capital lens.
    This long-term experiment was set up in 2005 to examine above- and below-ground processes operating during succession from moorland to woodland.
    This long-term experiment is tracking how pine trees grown from seed from Caledionan pinewoods across Scotland respond to climate change, pests and diseases.
    Capturing carbon in soil is a frequent feature of climate change mitigation measures, but the variability in soils and greenhouse gas emissions makes it difficult to evaluate results.
    This experiment is investigating whether increasing the number of plant species in grazed grasslands can help other biodiversity and increase the quality of the forage.